Five nights in Stanford

I’ve just returned from a mind-blowing trip to Stanford University, five days of back-to-back interviews with some of the most important figures in sleep research. It’ll all be in the book. This was made possible by a generous grant from The Society of Authors. I got to meet William Dement, a legend in the field of sleep medicine and the reason why Stanford has such a high concentration of great doctors and researchers interested in sleep. I spent several delightful hours in the company of Christian Guilleminault, less well known than Dement but, in my view, an equal partner in

Lonesome George has relatives

Lonesome George might be have passed away but he’s still making the news. Less than six months after his death, with his carapace still interred in a Galapagos freezer, it appears he may not have been the last of his kind after all. There is now clear evidence of giant tortoises with Pinta ancestry on another island in the archipelago. In a forthcoming study, geneticists from Yale University identify 17 hybrid tortoises with various combinations of Pinta genes on the nearby island of Isabela. The existence of these Pinta-like tortoises came to light by chance when an initial sample of

Extinct Galapagos tortoise has just been hiding

A species of Galapagos tortoise – thought to be extinct for over 150 years – may, in fact, be alive and well. This finding – made by geneticists at Yale University– is particularly surprising when you consider that this reptile is of giant proportions, measuring more than a metre from the front to the back of its shell and weighing more than 200 kg. How could such a behemoth have gone unnoticed for so long? The answer, it turns out, is simple. They’ve been hiding. When Charles Darwin visited the Galapagos Island of Floreana in 1835, he found no sign

The perfect swarm: GM mosquitoes

In a business park just outside Oxford, scientists are carefully breeding millions upon millions of mosquitoes. It’s not that they are particularly fond of these biting insects. The opposite, in fact, as their mosquitoes belong to a genetically engineered strain that could help tame the rampant spread of Dengue fever around the world I have the cover story in this week’s New Scientist that examines the science behind these GM mozzies and explores the potential of these and other genetically engineered species for controlling agricultural pests or invasive species. The idea is based on the so-called “sterile insect technique” (SIT)